Really 3D Display

Actually, it’s a table, but if you watch the linked movie, you’ll get it. This is the future of 3D in the classroom, not those goofy glasses that fool you into thinking you are seeing 3D images when your brain already does that for 2D images. It will be a while before the ability to physically interact with real objects is a commercially usable product to support teaching and learning, but take the 3 minutes and 41 seconds to see what’s possible.

http://tangible.media.mit.edu/project/inform/

From 2012 to 2013 and Beyond!

Lots of sites are putting up compilation posts about the ‘best of’ lists from last year, or predictions for what’s next for the coming year. This is not one of them. It would be too easy to say that technology will continue to get faster, better, smaller, more portable, and or less expensive. Pick any two or three of those attributes and you’ve got yourself a successful product. Instead, this is a post about what the near future will not look like.

As much as I’d like to see our eventual borgification, I don’t see that coming any time soon, at least in any meaningful way. This article from Wired is a good example of ways we might be melding man (gender neutral) and machine (platform neutral). I can see a few people using the ‘beat gloves’, but we won’t all be wearing them. An LED dress? Sure, but you won’t see them on sale at Target any time soon. The ‘turn signal jacket’ looks great, but most people still drive cars.

http://www.wired.com/design/2013/01/wearable-arduinos/?pid=1174

I’d still like to see wearable technology that would have application to teaching and learning. Maybe the LED dress could be used as a collection of maps, or the glove could help learn to play an actual musical instrument. Not sure about the LED eyelashes though. What ‘wearable technology’ could you use with your students?